ASQDE Logo

Donald B. Doud

ASQDE President - 1964-1966


 
  Donald Doud  
 

Donald Budlong Doud was the eighth President of the American Society of Questioned Document Examiners.

Donald Doud was born 1916, in Wisconsin, but lived most of his early life in California.  Mr. Doud, who had a background in photography, began his training in questioned document examination during World War II when he was hired by Clark Sellers to assist in trial preparation.  He also took classes in questioned document examination taught by John L. Harris at the University of Southern California.  After working for Mr. Sellers for six years, he worked for more than a year in the office of Albert D. Osborn in New York, followed by a year with Herbert J. Walter in Chicago.  In 1951, he settled in Milwaukee with John F. Tyrell.  Mr. Tyrell passed away in 1955 and Mr. Doud continued to work in private practice in Milwaukee for many years.

As a private examiner, Mr. Doud had many well-known cases, including the Alger Hiss prosecution, the Clifford Irving-Howard Hughes autobiography, and the Howard Hughes "Mormon" will contest.

In addition to the presidency of the Society, Mr. Doud served as Chairman of the Questioned Documents Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and on the board of the American Board of Forensic Document Examiners.  He lectured for twenty years before Fred Inbau's scientific evidence classes at Northwestern University, as well as the Ford Foundation Prosecutor's and Defense attorneys annual seminars.  He was the author of numerous published articles and professional papers.  He wrote the monograph "Scientific Evidence" for the 1959 Wisconsin Lawyers' Seminars.  Donald Doud passed away in 2005.

Shortly before his death, Mr. Doud was named the recipient of the 2005 Albert S. Osborn Award of Excellence.  In 2010, Mr. Doud's book, Witness to Forgery, was published posthumously.

 
Derived in part  from an article entitled, "Donald Budlong Doud: The 2005 Albert S. Osborn Award of Excellence Recipient", by John J. Harris, in the November 2005 issue of The Society News.